Ticket for three, please

We are planning a trip back to NZ in a few months.

Birds enjoying the last of the sunshine.  They rely on locals feeding them through the winter, in order to survive.

Bergen birds enjoying the last of the sunshine. They rely on locals feeding them through the winter, in order to survive.

As the days are rapidly getting colder and darker here, I’m already pining for the NZ sun.  But, the thought of embarking on a 35 hour journey with an infant, in confined, crowded spaces, with the slightest of babble generating angry death scowls from stressed passengers around you, is just a little worrying.

We decided to go for a practice session.

On the itinerary was a train journey to Voss, Norway’s adventure capital, the Norwegian equivalent of Queenstown.

We headed out at a leisurely 11am on a fine Saturday morning.

Due to a tunnel disaster, the intercity train was stranded, and we had to make do with the regional train.  So, we had slightly less comfort, with more confined seating – almost a little bit like flying long haul. Almost.  Actually, not really at all.

There's our train.  Due to tunnel disaster it was a local train.

There’s our train. Due to tunnel disaster it was a local train.

Getting ready for our practice journey.

Getting ready for our practice journey.

The trip took a little over an hour, and wound its way along fjords, and ravenous gorges.  We were treated to perhaps some of the world’s finest autumn scenery.

Junior entertained himself by the window, not so much appreciating the scenery, but rather bashing at his reflection whenever we went through a tunnel (of which there were many).

Once we arrived Voss, it was time for a quick feeding stop.  Tasty broccoli carrot mash with prunes.   We had about three hours before sunset and onset of early winter chill.  So, intrepid mountain climbing was out of the question, but I had read about a rather exciting gorge worthwhile to explore.

Arrival in Voss

Arrival in Voss

Voss lake

Voss lake

Baby stop

Baby stop

Fed, rested, and happy, we set out on our way.  The gorge was carved by glacial times, and we followed a cliff-hugging track through it.  It was almost intrepid.  But, since this was the tourist adventure capital, the Norwegian government seemed to have taken safety to a relative extreme.  This was the only track we had ever walked with safety rails.  And the track didn’t even follow a 1000m drop off.  Not even a 600m drop.

Ooh! A sign!  How un-norwegian.  We really are in tourist central.

Ooh! A sign! How un-norwegian. We really are in tourist central.

Heading up the valley to the gorge. Norsk houses on the hill

Heading up the valley to the gorge. Norsk houses on the hill

View of gorge

View of gorge

Extreme safety railing.  Anywhere else in Norway, there wouldn't be as much as a pole, or barely even a track.

Extreme safety railing. Anywhere else in Norway, there wouldn’t be as much as a pole, or barely even a track.

 

The tramp took about 1 1/2 hours return, giving us just enough time to stop at the town lake  for a late lunch and hot chocolate, before escaping the late afternoon chill and training back home.

A lovely, exciting trip- all without incidence, or death scowls.  Now if we can just manage the same on a journey 35x longer, we should be fine.

Full photo essay below.

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2 Responses to Ticket for three, please

  1. Simon says:

    I thought the issue with babies on planes was their tiny heads and ear canals can’t handle the reduced cabin pressure. To do a proper test you obviously need to build some kind of air tight baby box and see what happens when you hook it up to a vacuum pump with baby inside.

    Not too much vacuum though: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zz95_VvTxZM

    If you can get flights on 787s it might be better since they use higher cabin pressures.

    • michelle says:

      Yes, one of many challenges. Apparently the trick is to give them something to suck on during ascent and descent.

      We might take a practice flight to London to test this theory.

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